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The popular idea that the economic divide between Australia’s cities and regions is getting bigger is a misconception, according to new Grattan Institute research.

The working paper Regional patterns of Australia’s economy and population shows that beneath the oft-told ‘tale of two Australias’ is a more nuanced story.

Income growth and employment rates are not obviously worse in regional areas.

Cities and regions both have pockets of disadvantage, as well as areas with healthy income growth and low unemployment.

And while cities have higher average incomes, the gap in incomes between the cities and the regions is not getting wider.

Grattan Institute CEO John Daley said the research casts doubt on the idea that regional Australians are increasingly voting for minor parties because the regions are getting a raw deal compared to the cities.

“Given that people in regions have generally fared as well as those in cities over the past decade, major parties may need to look beyond income and employment to discover why dissatisfaction among regional voters is increasing,” he says.

The paper shows that the highest taxable incomes in Australia are in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, followed by Cottesloe in Perth and Stonnington in eastern Melbourne. The lowest taxable incomes are in Tasmania and the regions of the east-coast states, especially the far north coast of NSW, central Victoria and southern Queensland.

But income growth in the regions has kept pace with income growth in the cities over the past decade. The lowest income growth was typically in suburban areas of major cities.

While unemployment varies between regions, it is not noticeably worse in the regions overall. Some of the biggest increases in unemployment over the past five years were along transport ‘spines’ in cities, such as the Ipswich to Carole Park corridor in Brisbane and the Dandenong to Pakenham corridor in Melbourne.

The biggest difference between regions and cities is that inland regional populations are generally growing slower – particularly in non-mining states. Cities are attracting many more migrants, particularly from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. The east coast ‘sea change’ towns are also getting larger, but unemployment is relatively high.

The research will contribute to a forthcoming Grattan Institute report examining why the vote for minor parties has risen rapidly over the past decade, particularly in regional electorates.

Read the full report here.

 
                    [post_title] => City-country divide: not as wide as you may think
                    [post_excerpt] => That the economic divide between Australia’s cities and regions is getting bigger is a misconception.
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                    [post_content] => 

 

By Charles Pauka

To misquote Mark Twain ‘reports of the death of developments in the international trade agenda have been greatly exaggerated’ with the recent announcement that Australia has successfully concluded negotiations with New Zealand and 12 Pacific Island countries in Brisbane to implement the Pacific Agreement on Closer Economic Relations Plus (PACER Plus).

Australia was a party to the original PACER for some time but the development of PACER Plus has taken longer than anticipated and most recently a prospective date for completion of negotiations of June 2016 did not come to fruition. However, these types of negotiations rarely run to an exact timetable and the announcement comes at a welcome time, even though the deal has been struck without Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Fiji who had earlier withdrawn from the negotiations due to their reservations on what economic benefits would actually be delivered to them. It is not clear whether the deal would allow for PNG and Fiji to join before the final agreement is entered into. Interestingly the absence of PNG and Fiji from the deal does not appear in the press release by our Trade Minister.

The specific details of the agreement have yet to be released ahead of signing in Tonga in June.  However, according to the press release from the Minister of Trade:

“PACER Plus is a landmark agreement covering goods, services and investment. It will remove barriers to trade, including tariffs, increasing the flow of goods and investment in the region, generating growth, jobs and raising living standards.  This agreement will drive economic growth and raise living standards in our region.”

Read more here.

This story first appeared in Transport and Logistics News. 
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By Julian Bajkowski

The Coalition has gambled large on reviving Australia’s ageing copper telecommunications network to supply broadband download speeds of between 25 megabits per second and 100 megabits per second to deliver a heavily pared-down and cheaper version of the National Broadband Network (NBN) it claims will be completed by the end of 2019.

Speaking at the official launch of the Coalition’s broadband policy at Fox Sports studios in the Sydney suburb of Artarmon, Opposition leader Tony Abbott and shadow Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull laid out plans for a Fibre-to-the-Node (FTTN) network they claim can be delivered for far less than Labor’s present Fibre-to-the-Premises that has official headline cost $37.4 billion.

The Coalition’s official costing for its FTTN-based NBN now stands at $29.5 billion - a figure that is $7.9 billion cheaper than Labor’s official FTTP price-tag.

The announcement of the Coalition’s FTTN plans was widely anticipated after months of selected leaking.

However both Mr Turnbull and Mr Abbott have refused to give an estimate for the expected useable lifespan of the copper-based network that Telstra gladly agreed to vend into the NBN as part of a deal to structurally separate the carrier’s retail and wholesale arms.

The question of the realistic useful lifespan of the copper network is a key issue in terms of both costing and service delivery, especially when it comes to any necessity to renew connections directly to houses premises to achieve higher data carriage speeds.

Generally speaking, copper is now widely regarded within the telecommunications industry as being at the upper-end of achievable speeds; while optical fibre, which conveys data using photons rather than electrons, is believed to still have some way to go.

“Obviously all infrastructure has a lifespan, copper has a lifespan, fibre has a lifespan so all infrastructure has a lifespan. Infrastructure over time has to be renewed but there is no reason why most of the copper that is in place can’t continue to be used,” Mr Abbott said in response to a question from Government News.

“One of the problems with the Labor NBN is that it junks perfectly useful infrastructure, it junks useful copper, useful HFC (hybrid coaxial) cabling and we don’t want to do this,” Mr Abbott said   just before Mr Turnbull jumped in to better clarify how the Coalition sees the boundaries of copper’s capacity.

“When you roll out a FTTN network you should always do so with a view to having the option of going FTTP down the track,” Mr Turnbull said.

Just how far down the track in terms of time and what optical replacements may later be required is an important factor for communities relying on copper, not least because they could potentially be left behind areas that get fibre.

Another important issue is that if the lifespan of copper in a particular area is relatively short, further upgrades could be later required later at an additional cost.

When asked what the Coalition’s estimate for the lifespan of copper was, Mr Turnbull said “nobody knows”   before talking-up copper’s potential to be turbo-charged.

“Copper is delivering much faster speeds today through xdsl, adsl, adsl+, vdsl vdsl2+, vdsl 2+ with vectoring,” Mr Turnbull said.

“All of these technologies are delivering dramatically higher speeds. You’re getting over 100 [megabits per second] on the copper you so deride. [Telecommunication carriers] around the world are delivering this.”

“Putting that additional fibre capacity out to the fibre distribution point is very cheap to do . . .  so that’s how you provision fibre on demand, that’s how you provision upgrades.”

These recent developments in making copper faster were not around when the Coalition had previously considered FTTN Mr Turnbull said.

While the Coalition’s commitment to retaining copper and pay-television cabling as a means to deliver faster broadband is unlikely to please most of the local technology industry, the Coalition’s broadband election policy is still substantially more thorough than a previous attempt that saw both Mr Abbott and erstwhile Communications shadow Tony Smith flounder badly on details.

In a tacit admission of how badly askew the Coalition previous broadband policy went, Mr Abbott repeatedly praised Mr Turnbull’s efforts to deliver a policy that he said was one of the best offered yet by an opposition.

Mr Abbott is now effusive in his enthusiasm for the technology that has previously caused the Coalition so many headaches – and cost it votes and ultimately government because of the position of the independents at the last election.

“Our modern lives are absolutely unimaginable without access to broadband technology. I couldn’t do my job without access to broadband technology,” Mr Abbott said – a far cry from his previous directive to Mr Turnbull to demolish the NBN.

“Teachers, nurses, businesspeople, people at home, millions and millions of Australians are using broadband every single day and it’s important that they are getting better broadband services than they are currently getting under this government,” Mr Abbott said.

But there also some important caveats on the Coalition’s reuse of copper, especially in areas where the heritage telecommunications plumbing is experiencing difficulties.

“In an area where there is a lot of ground water and there are a lot of problems, endemic problems with the copper – that’s an area where you might put fibre right through that part of the country,” Mr Turnbull said.

“You just make a rational business decision, a cost effective business decision.”

In terms of implementation detail and timelines, the Coalition has vowed to undertake a “strategic review” of NBN Co. if elected which it expects will report back to it within 60 days on a slew of issues including progress, financial status and the cost and time under existing policies and the costs and times of variations like running FTTN to established areas.

A second probe will come in the form of “a separate independent audit to examine the public policy process which led to the NBN and the NBN Co’s governance.”

And a third review will come in the form of an “independent cost benefit analysis and review of regulation” that will look into the “direct and indirect value, in economic and social terms, of increased broadband speeds, and to what extent broadband should be supported by the government?”

At the policy launch Mr Turnbull confirmed that a cost benefit analysis would also include the present NBN model.

The trifecta of governance and policy investigations constitute prudent insurance for an incoming government because they can act to realign public and industry expectations in terms of any changes to stated election policies base – all based on arm’s-length or independent advice.

They could also buy the Coalition valuable time if the extent of the present NBN rollout makes delivering an FTTN alternative slower, or more expensive, than the Coalition has publicly anticipated.

Both Mr Abbott and Mr Turnbull confirmed that the NBN will stay ‘off Budget’ in terms of its financial treatment in government accounts.

As for selling off the controversial infrastructure asset in the future – which is how Telstra came to become a private rather than a government entity – Mr Abbott said “we won’t sell until it’s ready to sell.”

“The deal will not be bad news for Telstra. Telstra shareholders have nothing to fear from our approach,” Mr Abbott said.

Telstra shares closed higher by 2 per cent at $4.58.

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By Lilia Guan
 
Australian deputy prime minister and treasurer, Wayne Swan has released the 2011-2012 budget, with the promise of getting the country back into the black.
 
Mr Swan stated the floods and Cyclone Yasi will cost our economy $9 billion in lost output and reduce real gross domestic product growth by half of a percent point in 2010-11.
 
The impact of disasters in New Zealand and Japan will increase this impact to three quarters of a percent point this year.
 
“The economy and the budget are also still feeling the after-effects of the global financial crisis, with losses that accumulated during that period larger and lingering longer than previously anticipated,” Mr Swan said.
 
“Tax receipts have been revised down by $16 billion over the first two budget years, taking the total estimated revenue loss from the global financial crisis to around $130 billion over five years.”
 
Despite these issues the Government plans to invest money into creating jobs and boosting the economy.
 
Mr Swan announced the Government will invest $3 billion over six years in skilling Australia's workforce and deliver a package of participation reforms.
 
“We will place industry at the heart of our training agenda, with a $558 million Workforce Development Fund that will deliver 130,000 training places over four years,” he said.
 
The Budget also delivers a $101 million national mentoring program to help 40,000 apprentices finish training and better meet the needs of industries and regions.
 
Mr Swan stated the Government planned to invest $100 million in more flexible training models, allowing apprenticeships to be fast-tracked as they acquire critical trade skills.

It will provide up to $1.75 billion over five years from 2012-13 to states and territories under a national partnership, on top of our existing $7 billion investment, to drive ambitious reforms of the vocational education and training system.
 
The Budget also funds 30,000 more places in the Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program to provide the basic skills essential for a job.
 
“We're also reaching out to disadvantaged and marginalised groups who risk missing out on the benefits of the strong economy with a combination of rewards, opportunities and requirements,” Mr Swan said.
 
The Government will cut tax rates for 50,000 single parents who work part-time by up to 20 cents in the dollar, invest $80 million in their skills and move more parents with high-school kids onto job search payments.
 
To remove tax breaks that can encourage people without children to stay at home, the Budget will phase out of the Dependent Spouse Tax Offset for people born on or after 1 July 1971.
 
For young people, the Government will extend ‘Earn’ or ‘Learn’ requirements to 21-year olds and create new pathways to full-time employment for early school leavers.
 
The Government will invest $233 million in 35,000 targeted wage subsidies and extended work experience programs.
 
Mr Swan stated the budget will allow people with a disability to work more without jeopardising their benefits and introduce new requirements for younger people aged 35 and under on the disability pension with some capacity to work to develop participation plans with Centrelink.
 
The Government also planned to deliver major investments in health along with a package of mental health reform.
 
Mr Swan said the Government will invest $2.2 billion over five years to deliver additional services, a greater focus on prevention and early intervention, and a more targeted and better coordinated mental health care system as a step towards long-term reform.
 
It will also invest $16.4 billion in extra growth funding for public hospitals over six years under our new health deal with the States and Territories.
 
The Budget brings to $1.8 billion investment in hospitals and health care for our regions through the Regional Priority Round of the Health and Hospitals Fund.
 
It will also provide $717 million of funding over five years to expand access to diagnostic imaging services and make new medicines and immunisations more affordable.
 
An extra $53 million will improve access to public dental services, particularly for those on low incomes, and build a bigger dental workforce in preparation for significant reform in 2012-13.
 
Mr Swan stated the Government planned to pursue its “goal of creating the best educated and trained workforce in the world”.
 
“We'll provide $125 million each semester, from the start of 2014, in reward payments for the best teachers,” he said.
 
“Around 25,000 of the country's best teachers each year will receive a reward payment worth up to 10 per cent of their salary.
 
“We will also invest $200 million over three years for the More Support for Students with Disabilities initiative. This will support students with disability in their classrooms and improve learning outcomes.”
 
Mr Swan stated the budget included measures to provide help with cost of living pressures particularly for Australians on low incomes and families with kids at school.
 
From July, the Government will bring forward up to $300 per year of the low income tax offset into pay packets, rather than being delivered at the end of the year.
 
Family Tax Benefit Part A payments for families with teenagers will be increased by up to $4,208 per year to support families to keep their teenagers in school or vocational training.
 
The Education Tax Refund will also be extended to school uniforms to help with education costs, increasing the Government's investment by $460 million.
 
Payment advances of up to 7.5 per cent of their entitlement (capped at $1000) will be provided to meet unexpected family expenses, and giving parents the choice to receive child care support at the time they incur their child care costs.
 
The budget also includes $4.3 billion of investments in regional infrastructure including hospitals, health care, universities and roads.
 
“These investments, along with the National Broadband Network, will help lift living standards outside the big cities, provide the best health services and educational opportunities, and help regional communities reach their potential,” Mr Swan said.
 
Australian businesses - especially small businesses – that are doing it tough because of consumer caution, natural disasters and the high dollar will also have some relief.

This Budget will expand tax breaks that provide cash-flow benefits available to all 2.7 million Australian small businesses, replacing the Entrepreneurs Tax Offset which was only available to around 400000 businesses.
 
The Government will build on the $5000 instant asset write-off announced last year by allowing small businesses to claim $5000 as an immediate deduction for motor vehicles purchased from 2012-13. This measure will provide a $350 million cash flow benefit to small business.
 
To make sure local enterprises can seize the manufacturing opportunities presented by the boom, the Budget includes a $34 million package to help Australian suppliers win more contracts to supply resource sector projects.
 
The solar industry will also receive an additional $13.7 million over two years for the Solar Cities Program.
 
Also an additional $53.2 million over four years has been provided to the Office of the Renewable Energy Regulator to provide ORER with resources for additional statutory responsibilities.
 
Australian Solar Energy Society (Auses), CEO John Grimes said funding for the Emerging Renewables program increased from $40 million to $100 million.
 
Despite the funding, Mr Grimes said the industry will also see cuts being made.
 
“It is now even more important the Federal Budget allocates 25 percent of the revenue from a carbon price to an independent Green Investment Bank,” he said.
 
“[The funds would be used] for investment in research and development, demonstration and early commercialisation of large-scale solar and the emerging energy sources.”
 
Non-profit property organisation, Urban Taskforce Australia said the budget has taken some new, but small, steps towards improving the fabric of cities.
 
The Taskforce’s chief executive, Aaron Gadiel, said the new measures were mostly “good news”, but represent only a small fraction of the federal investment that will ultimately be required.
 
Mr Gadiel said the promise of a $36 million “top-down” strategic review of infrastructure by Infrastructure Australia would help sharpen the Government’s accountability for its funding decisions.
 
“This move give’s Infrastructure Australia the resources and mandate it needs to take the lead on indentifying projects for federal funding,” Mr Gadiel said.
 
“It no longer needs to wait passively for state and local governments to serve it up project proposals.
 
“This will remove the Commonwealth’s ability to blame state governments for poor quality funding submissions."
 
Mr Gadiel said that the $100 million four-year initiative to fund employment hubs in suburban areas was a very practical measure to reduce congestion in our big cities.

 “Instead of banning or stopping urban expansion, they are now talking about pro-actively supporting employment growth,” he said.
 
“This will help match jobs to the strong need for expanded residential areas at the edge of our cities.
 
He believed ultimately the scheme will need a lot more money, but was an "excellent start".

Mr Gadiel said the $20 million two-year scheme to fund urban renewal projects is welcome, but the funding allocation is modest and its focus on “demonstration projects” will limit its effectiveness.
 
“This Commonwealth should be neck-deep in its support for urban renewal initiatives, but this program is really just a toe in the water.”
 
Mr Gadiel said the budget had also allocated $10.1 million for the development and monitoring of new “sustainability indicators”.
 
“It’s important that these indicators reflect the sustainability concerns of the mainstream community, and the Federal Government ensures that the process is not taken over by fringe groups,” he said.
 
Mr Gadiel welcomed the announcement of the Prime Minister’s decision to begin “rigorous COAG process” to lead the development of Commonwealth-State reforms.
 
“The focus on ‘easing congestion’ suggests we might see action on the highly restrictive land use laws that are currently preventing sufficient new homes being built close to jobs, transport and services in the inner suburbs of our major cities,” he said.
 
The Productivity Commission is expected to publicly release its report to COAG on the reform of planning, zoning and development assessment laws next week.
 
However Mr Gadiel said the decision to wipe $150 million in funding for the F3 to Sydney Orbital project from the forward estimates period was very disappointing.
 
“This effectively puts this major motorway project on ice - as far as the Commonwealth concerned,” he said.
 
The project would be part of the national highway network - making federal funding essential. It was identified by the new NSW Government as a
“missing link” motorway that might be supported by the O’Farrell Government in its first term.
 
“The axing of this project will be a blow to anyone who drives on Pennant Hills Road regularly, and dashes hopes that we might see some better connectivity between Sydney and the Central Coast and Lower Hunter,” he said.

 
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The Queensland Government will promote the state’s economic recovery to key markets in Asia after a summer of natural disasters.
 
Treasurer and Trade Minister Andrew Fraser will lead a trade mission to Asia with Queensland businesses to meet with senior government and business leaders to promote the state’s improving economic prosperity.
 
A range of issues will be discussed Beijing, Seoul, Taipei, Kaohsiung, Jakarta and Bangkok, on economic opportunities in energy, resources, food and education and training industries.
 
Mr Fraser said Asia is Queensland’s key export destination and that the message needs to be spread that the state is “well and truly open for business”.
 
“China, Korea, Taiwan, and Indonesia are all among our six largest export partners, accounting for $15 billion worth of exports last financial year,” he said.
 
“They are key markets for some of our largest export products, such as agriculture, coal, education and training,” he said.
 
Mr. Fraser will address the China Go Global Overseas Investment Conference and will also visit Taiwan to open a forum on geothermal energy with the Indonesian Minister for Energy and Mineral Resources.
 
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By Angela Dorizas

Australia has bucked the global trend and avoided a recession, but for local government in Victoria, the future economic outlook is constrained.

The Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) has warned that council costs are likely to increase by an average of three per cent in 2009-2010.

MAV’s annual Local Government Cost Index, released this week, revealed that growth in council costs had slowed in response to the economic downturn, but councils would continue to outlay more to deliver the same level of services to their communities.

MAV president Bill McArthur told GovernmentNews that councils were “not recession proof”.

 “Local government relies heavily on staff and contractors to deliver more than 100 services to communities and extensive capital works programs to maintain and renew community infrastructure worth more than $47 billion,” Cr McArthur said.

“Councils are not recession-proof and must continue to deliver high quality services that support community needs, while also limiting cost increases to reduce the pressure on ratepayers. It is a difficult balancing act.”

Wednesday’s national accounts figures, which revealed 0.4 per cent economic growth for the March quarter, were of little comfort to Victorian councils.

“That was a welcome figure, of course, but we’re certainly not out of the woods,” Cr McArthur said.

 “We need to be much more efficient in the way we work. Through the Future of Local Government program we’re looking at more efficient ways to purchase services, so in the procurement area we’re making great gains.”

Despite substantial growth in councils’ construction expenditure, Cr McArthur called on councils to increase spending to address the annual $280 million infrastructure backlog.

“If assets aren’t adequately maintained and renewed it creates a huge cost impost on future generations.”

However, Cr McArthur urged councils to examine all possible opportunities to “trim non-essential costs and improve productivity and service deliver”.

“It is incumbent upon governments to show restraint and demonstrate compassion during these challenging economic times,” he said.

“This year we’re seeing some council budgets propose reduced surpluses or increased borrowings for capital works in order to limit rate increases for property owners.

“These are responsible approaches if used as short term financial measures to help stimulate the economy.”

“In the long term it will reduce costs, because it is bringing forward infrastructure improvements, needed infrastructure. Hopefully they keep going with that infrastructure fund, which will alleviate a lot of the long term costs.

“In the short term it probably creates another problem in where we probably need to look at borrowing to supplement some of the infrastructure funding, so we need to be responsible in the way we do it.”

[post_title] => Council costs set to increase: MAV [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => council-costs-set-to-increase-mav [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-02-11 12:04:40 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-02-11 01:04:40 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27757 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-08-03 19:42:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-03 09:42:31 [post_content] => The popular idea that the economic divide between Australia’s cities and regions is getting bigger is a misconception, according to new Grattan Institute research. The working paper Regional patterns of Australia’s economy and population shows that beneath the oft-told ‘tale of two Australias’ is a more nuanced story. Income growth and employment rates are not obviously worse in regional areas. Cities and regions both have pockets of disadvantage, as well as areas with healthy income growth and low unemployment. And while cities have higher average incomes, the gap in incomes between the cities and the regions is not getting wider. Grattan Institute CEO John Daley said the research casts doubt on the idea that regional Australians are increasingly voting for minor parties because the regions are getting a raw deal compared to the cities. “Given that people in regions have generally fared as well as those in cities over the past decade, major parties may need to look beyond income and employment to discover why dissatisfaction among regional voters is increasing,” he says. The paper shows that the highest taxable incomes in Australia are in Sydney’s eastern suburbs, followed by Cottesloe in Perth and Stonnington in eastern Melbourne. The lowest taxable incomes are in Tasmania and the regions of the east-coast states, especially the far north coast of NSW, central Victoria and southern Queensland. But income growth in the regions has kept pace with income growth in the cities over the past decade. The lowest income growth was typically in suburban areas of major cities. While unemployment varies between regions, it is not noticeably worse in the regions overall. Some of the biggest increases in unemployment over the past five years were along transport ‘spines’ in cities, such as the Ipswich to Carole Park corridor in Brisbane and the Dandenong to Pakenham corridor in Melbourne. The biggest difference between regions and cities is that inland regional populations are generally growing slower – particularly in non-mining states. Cities are attracting many more migrants, particularly from Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. The east coast ‘sea change’ towns are also getting larger, but unemployment is relatively high. The research will contribute to a forthcoming Grattan Institute report examining why the vote for minor parties has risen rapidly over the past decade, particularly in regional electorates. Read the full report here.   [post_title] => City-country divide: not as wide as you may think [post_excerpt] => That the economic divide between Australia’s cities and regions is getting bigger is a misconception. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => city-country-divide-not-wide-may-think [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-03 19:47:11 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-03 09:47:11 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27757 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 6 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 75dac56604a6f9653c9ada2cc4bdc154 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

economy

economy

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