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                    [post_date] => 2017-06-16 12:00:08
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                    [post_content] => 

 

By Charles Pauka

CASE builds the machines for the long haul. And as councils typically keep their plant and equipment for 8+ years, they can rest assured knowing that their CASE machine will not only perform for its first life with Council, but continue to perform through its 2nd and 3rd lives once replaced and sold to a new owner.

For performance, reliability and resale value, councils around Australia continue to place their trust in CASE equipment – again and again.

Founded in 1842, CASE Construction Equipment has over the last 175 years built a reputation as a leading and respected global manufacturer of construction equipment.

Today, CASE offers a full line of equipment with over 90 different models around the world, including heavy excavators, wheel loaders, crawler dozers, skid-steer loaders, mini excavators, and backhoe loaders.

CASE equipment and technologies deliver productivity, efficiency, fuel economy and cost-effectiveness to the benefit of its customers’ bottom line. CASE innovates to design equipment that is intuitive and straightforward to use so that operators maximise their productivity.

GovernmentNews.com.au would like to congratulate CASE Construction Equipment on its 175 years of building productivity, and to celebrate, you can view a comprehensive and informative guide to CASE’s history, products and capabilities by clicking on this link.

Government agencies and contractors need access to a full line of equipment, including heavy excavators, wheel loaders, crawler dozers, skid-steer loaders, mini excavators, and backhoe loaders, for maximum productivity and fast results. Read on to find out where to get your hands on the best equipment and back-up in Australia today. Full report here. 

 
                    [post_title] => Governments trust CASE
                    [post_excerpt] => Machines built for the long haul.
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                    [post_date] => 2017-06-16 11:31:34
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                    [post_content] => 

 

By Charles Pauka

Australian governments, vehicle manufacturers, transport technology providers and other interested parties have been asked to contribute to the development of a national safety assurance regime for automated vehicles.

The National Transport Commission (NTC) has released a discussion paper Regulatory options to assure automated vehicle safety in Australia, which examines the balance between government oversight and industry self-regulation for automated vehicle safety. The paper identifies four regulatory options for a safety assurance system for automated vehicle technology.

Chief executive of the NTC Paul Retter said Australia’s transport ministers asked the NTC to look at what level of regulation is needed to ensure automated driving technologies are safe now and into the future.

“Australian governments are starting to remove legislative barriers to more automated road vehicles. Without a safety assurance system, these vehicles could potentially be deployed with no government oversight or regulatory intervention,” Mr Retter said.

Read more here.

This story first appeared in Transport and Logistics News. 
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                    [post_excerpt] => National Transport Commission releases discussion paper. 
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                    [post_date] => 2017-06-13 12:52:02
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                    [post_content] => 

 

By Lucy Marrett 

The 7-Eleven wage repayment scheme has so far repaid over $110 million in unpaid wages.

However former wage repayment chairman Professor Allan Fels has raised concerns about minimal fines.

The current payout has eclipsed penalties under existing laws and raised questions about a new law that the Federal Government has proposed, Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Mr Fels said the fines imposed under the existing laws would be minimal in comparison to the 7-Eleven payouts.

“The far stronger deterrent effect for others is if they know they have to make up the underpayments in full – in this case $110 million plus, compared to if they just have to pay a fine,” he said.

“The Fair Work Act system just imposes fines and very limited compensation on the individuals whose cases are considered. But the court system works quite badly for systematic underpayment of thousands of people.”

Read more here.

This story first appeared in C&I Week. 
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                    [post_content] => 

Pastures new in Camden, south-west Sydney. Pic: Facebook.
By Josh Harris
This story first appeared in ArchitectureAU and appears here by kind permission.
The New South Wales government has unveiled a plan to increase housing supply by making it easier to build in new development areas. The proposed new Greenfield Housing Code would see homes in new release areas approved in 20 days compared to the 71 days it currently takes on average. Minister for Housing and Planning Anthony Roberts said the government was committed to speeding up the delivery of new homes in greenfield areas to meet the needs of the state’s growing population and improve housing affordability. “This type of streamlined approval not only speeds up the delivery of new housing, but makes it easier and cheaper for people to build homes to suit their lifestyles and incomes,” he said. NSW opposition leader Luke Foley said the government was not doing enough to tackle housing affordability. “This Government has had six years to act on housing affordability but has done nothing,” he said. “Labor will take to the next state election a comprehensive plan to level the playing field in favour of home buyers and help those on modest incomes get a roof over their heads.” Following the release of the proposed Greenfield Housing Code, the opposition unveiled its plan to mandate a target for the provision of affordable housing. Read more here
[post_title] => We’re not in the 1950s anymore’: NSW greenfield housing plan ‘not sustainable,’ Institute says [post_excerpt] => Cautions expanding urban sprawl. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => not-1950s-anymore-nsw-greenfield-housing-plan-not-sustainable-institute-says [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-09 10:01:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-09 00:01:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27335 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27340 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-06-08 05:00:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-07 19:00:15 [post_content] => Pic: University of Sydney Union.   By Danielle Bowling  The cuts to penalty rates announced earlier this year won’t be completed until 2020, according to a ruling by the Fair Work Commission (FWC). The FWC announced that the reformed penalty rate conditions for part-time and full-time hospitality employees working on Sundays would be phased in over three years, commencing from 1 July 2017. Sunday penalty rates would be reduced from 175 percent to 170 percent in 2017-18, from 170 percent to 160 percent in 2018-19, and from 160 percent to 150 percent in 2019-2020.
Public holiday penalty rate reductions for both Hospitality and Restaurant Awards will take effect from 1 July 2017.
Sunday rates for casual employees will not change.
“Hotels will now be able to make long term decisions about the future operation of outlets on Sundays,” said Ferguson. “The reform could lead hotels to increasing trading hours and services and employing more staff.” Read more here. This story first appeared in Hospitality Magazine.  [post_title] => Penalty rate cuts won’t be fully implemented until 2020 [post_excerpt] => Sunday penalty rates down to 150% by 2020. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => penalty-rate-cuts-wont-fully-implemented-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-09 10:02:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-09 00:02:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27340 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27306 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-06-05 18:41:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-05 08:41:50 [post_content] =>

 

Is the federal government two Tim Tams short of a packet?

 

By Lucy Marrett 

The federal government is backing a principles-based approach for product packaging in response to industry calls to review measurement labelling laws. The government was responding to calls to address industry requests to cut red tape with options to change measurement marking placement rules. At present, a products exact weight and/or volume must appear on the front of the packet under the national trade measurements regulations (NTMR) 2009 Part 4. If the industry proposal is successful, weight and volume markings could be moved from the front of packaging making it difficult for consumers to compare products and value for money. The current proposal to review the NTMR outlines three possible options: leave regulations as they are; clarify the regulations; implement a principles-based approach. The government is in favour of the third option, which, if implemented will see the removal of regulations controlling size, orientation, and position of the measurement mark. Read more here.  This story first appeared in C&I Week.
[post_title] => Industry vs consumer in labelling laws review [post_excerpt] => Removing weight and volume markings from packaging. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => government-vs-consumer-packaging-laws-review [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-06 11:26:36 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-06 01:26:36 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27306 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27264 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-30 12:48:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-30 02:48:56 [post_content] =>   By Andy Young The NSW Liquor Amendment (Reviews) Bill, which was passed by the State Parliament last week, will see strikes recorded against licensed venues removed. The changes to the laws will see strikes now recorded against the licensee rather than the venue, as The Shout reported earlier this week. Minister Paul Toole said it would be “impractical” for the previous strikes to remain in place when moving forward with the new scheme as it would mean that two different schemes would be in place at the same time. Arthur Laundy, whose hotel The Steyne in Manly received a strike, told TheShout that he felt "vindicated in as much as right from the start I have said that I don’t believe this is a fair rule". "I’ve said it right from the start, the government got it right with the clubs, but they didn’t get it right with the hotels," Laundy said. As I explained to someone yesterday who was struggling to understand the issue: you own a trucking company and you employ drivers, if a driver goes out and has a serious accident, who should get the penalty? The driver of the truck, or the owner of the truck? He said, good analogy, I understand." He added: "I own the hotel, but I’m not at the hotel. I’m not the licensee. I’ve never considered it was a fair rule. I’ve argued now for some years on exactly that line. People have called me this morning to say it was a good victory, and I’ve said it was fair. I don’t think I asked for anything that was unfair." Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => New rules see licence strikes cleared [post_excerpt] => Pubs vindicated. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27264 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-30 12:48:56 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-30 02:48:56 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27264 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27254 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-30 11:35:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-30 01:35:53 [post_content] => By Stephen Duckett, Director, Health Program, Grattan Institute This story first appeared in The Conversation   Leaked documents reported by Fairfax Media yesterday reveal Commonwealth bureaucrats are considering a proposal to simplify how public hospitals are funded in Australia. While Labor has jumped on the leaks as further proof of the government’s risky approach to public health, Health Minister Greg Hunt has said the proposals would never be government policy. A byproduct of Australia’s fractured federalism is that both the Commonwealth and state governments fund public hospitals. Currently, public hospital funding is split 38% to 53% between the Commonwealth and state governments respectively – the remaining 9% is private funding. The Commonwealth also funds a major share of private hospital costs, albeit indirectly through the private health insurance rebate. So about 50% of private hospital funding comes from private health insurers, with a further 30% coming through health insurers, but sourced from the Commonwealth government, because of the private health insurance rebate. So complex are these arrangements that a funding flow diagram for public hospitals resembles an upended bowl of spaghetti. The leaked plan proposes a seemingly tidy new funding formula dubbed the “Commonwealth Hospital Benefit”.  
Public hospital funding is a complex arrangement. National Health Funding Body

What we know so far

The leaked plan’s reported headline proposal is that the government rebate, which aims to encourage people to take out private health insurance, be transformed into a direct private hospital subsidy. In other words, the private health insurance rebate – which subsidises up to 35% of the cost of both hospital and general (ancillary) insurance – would be abolished, as would the Medicare rebate for medical services for private patients in hospitals. Instead, a new rebate would be paid directly to private hospitals, with the level of the payment depending on the type of treatment and procedures provided. Similarly, Commonwealth block grants to the states for public hospital care would be replaced by a direct payment to public hospitals, again depending on the treatments and procedures provided. The Commonwealth Hospital Benefit would work in a similar way to the Medicare Benefit Schedule. So the Commonwealth would publish a list of fees it would pay for particular types of hospital care. These fees would be equally available to public and private hospitals. Presumably the fees would be based on what is called the National Efficient Price – currently used to determine Commonwealth payments to states for increases in public hospital activity – published by the Independent Hospital Pricing Authority. Basing payment on a National Efficient Price will help make the private hospital sector more efficient, in the same way that it has improved efficiency in public hospitals.

Neat and tidy, but…

A Commonwealth Hospital Benefit would certainly be neat and tidy. It would increase transparency of Commonwealth funding support for both public and private hospitals. And it would replace the complex arrangements for private hospitals, where Commonwealth support for private hospital care is partly channelled through private health insurers and partly offered through the MBS rebate and the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). But important questions remain. At present, Commonwealth support for public hospitals is capped: it can grow no faster than 6.5% each year. Commonwealth support for private insurance, however, grows with any growth in membership; and growth in MBS and PBS outlays is uncapped. Will the proposed scheme be capped? If so, how? Current Commonwealth support for public hospitals is conditional on there being no out-of-pocket costs to patients. Would the new scheme retain that condition? Similarly, the Commonwealth’s indirect support for private hospitals is available only to those with private health insurance – because it is paid through the private health insurance rebate. About 7% of overnight-stay patients and 9% of same-day patients in private hospitals pay in full for their own care.
Further reading: The multi-billion-dollar subsidy for private health insurance isn’t worth it
Will these patients also become eligible for Commonwealth subsidies? That is, will the new private hospital subsidy be available only to those with private insurance and, if so, will any type of private insurance fulfil this condition? Fairfax claims the leaked report suggests that, on current modelling, the share of Commonwealth support for public hospitals might decline from around 40% now to around 35%. This would require the states to devote a bigger proportion of their already tight budgets to health care. The premiers could be expected to object loudly to any reduction. They might pass on the budget cut to public hospitals, and sheet home the blame to the Commonwealth. Certainly, the political optics for the federal Coalition – still reeling from Labor’s 2016 election “Mediscare” campaign – would not be good.

What about private hospitals?

Private hospitals and doctors might also not welcome the proposed arrangement. Private hospitals might enjoy the reduced scrutiny by private insurers, but some negotiations would presumably still be needed between insurers and hospitals about what level of out-of-pocket costs members could face. Private hospitals might also become responsible for paying medical rebates to surgeons, psychiatrists and other doctors who treat patients in their hospital. The private hospital administrators might find dealing with insurers much easier than negotiating how to divide the new “hospital benefit” between the doctors, pharmacists, allied health staff and the hospital, all of whom currently bill separately. Alternatively, private insurers might be expected to cover these costs. Again, this would require complex negotiations on precisely what payments might be appropriate. If there was no net change in Commonwealth funding to private hospital care, the financial position of private insurers would be unchanged, because their outlays would be reduced in line with the reduction in the Commonwealth subsidy. But again, there are risks here for insurers. If the benefit was available to all patients, and not just the insured, private insurers might lose business as members downgrade to the minimum acceptable product. And it could become harder for insurers to persuade people to take up private insurance, given many people see the current private health insurance rebate as ensuring they get value for money from their insurance purchases. There are good reasons to want to simplify and make more transparent the extremely complex flows of Commonwealth funding to both public and private hospitals. But there are also risks in the change. [post_title] => Why the seemingly tidy, leaked proposal for hospital funding may be a problem policy [post_excerpt] => Will the scheme be capped? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27254 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-30 12:50:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-30 02:50:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27254 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27233 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-26 05:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-25 19:00:00 [post_content] =>   By Andy Young The Liquor Stores Association NSW (LSA NSW) has welcomed the proposed changes to the state’s Three Strikes Disciplinary Scheme, which are currently before Parliament as part of the Liquor Amendment (Reviews) Bill 2017. The Bill is the State Government’s response to the comprehensive review undertaken by the Hon Ian Callinan AC QC last year, which recommended a range of reforms to NSW’s liquor laws, including changes to the Three Strikes Scheme. LSA NSW Executive Director Michael Waters has welcomed the proposed changes, calling them “sensible and pragmatic”. “The proposed changes to the Three Strikes Scheme as part of the Liquor Amendment (Reviews) Bill 2017 are sensible, pragmatic, and have been long-awaited by industry," Waters said. “Having provision for a proper appeals process, and strikes for serious breaches of liquor laws to be incurred by individual licensees, rather than being attached to the actual licence, are important and common sense improvements that reinforces the importance of making servers directly accountable for their actions.     Read more here.  This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Changes to NSW Three Strikes Scheme welcomed [post_excerpt] => Breaches attached to licensees, not licenses. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => changes-nsw-three-strikes-scheme-welcomed [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-25 16:01:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-25 06:01:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27233 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27237 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-25 16:20:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-25 06:20:57 [post_content] =>   By Charles Pauka  Parkes Shire Council has appealed to Amazon to site one its distribution centres (Amazon calls the large warehouses 'fulfilment centres') in the Central NSW town, by making a quirky video showing a fan buying an Elvis outfit online from Amazon. When the retail disruption giant recently put the word out that they were looking to establish an Australian arm, full of optimism (one of its best traits) the town of Parkes in Central NSW responded with why its strategic location would be advantageous to the Amazon business model. With freight volumes set to double by 2030 and triple by 2050, Parkes will form an integral part of the intermodal freight network. Parkes acts as a national transport node, as it is strategically located at the intersection of the Newell Highway and major railways linking Melbourne, Brisbane, Sydney and Perth as well as Adelaide and Darwin. Parkes’ position has been further enhanced by the recent announcement as a critical node on the Melbourne to Brisbane Inland Rail project, which has received one of the largest investments ever seen in regional Australia of $8.4 billion. The project will connect the region to global markets via the major ports of Australia, placing the Central West region into an economically advantageous position once the project comes into fruition. In addition to employment and investment opportunities, the National Logistics Hub in Parkes offers cheaper, faster and more efficient modal choices, and offers a centralised storage and distribution point for a range of commodities. Read more here. This story first appeared in Transport & Logistics & News.  [post_title] => Parkes Shire Council pitches to Amazon with Elvis video [post_excerpt] => Regional development, Elvis style. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => parkes-pitches-amazon-elvis-video [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-25 16:22:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-25 06:22:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27237 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27229 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-25 15:35:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-25 05:35:09 [post_content] =>

The Health Star Rating System has been slammed as unhelpful and misleading. 
By Lucy Marrett
Championed to make packaged food choices simpler, the HSRS was launched three years ago but of late has been receiving criticism suggesting there is a fundamental flaw in the system. The federal government’s Heath Star Rating System (HSRS) has been referred to as flawed and in urgent need of review. What exactly is the HSRS? According to the official HSRS website it is: “a front-of-pack labelling system that rates the overall nutritional profile of packaged food and assigns it a rating from ½ a star to 5 stars. It provides a quick, easy, standard way to compare similar packaged foods. The more stars, the healthier the choice.” It was designed as a way to make choosing healthy options simple and quick, taking the hassle out of reading nutrition labels, and instead provide a clear visual guide.   Read more here. This story first appeared in C&I Week.
[post_title] => Flaws in the health star rating system [post_excerpt] => The HSRS remains voluntary for food companies. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27229 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-25 16:24:00 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-25 06:24:00 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27229 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27196 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-23 12:33:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-23 02:33:54 [post_content] =>
 
By Linda Cheng This story first appeared in ArchitectureAu and appears here by kind permission of the author. In its 2017–18 budget, the federal government released what it called “comprehensive plan to address housing affordability.” While promising “no silver bullet,” the government claimed its plan was “designed to improve outcomes across the housing spectrum.” The plan includes measures such as a $1 billion National Housing and Infrastructure Facility (NHIF), releasing surplus Commonwealth land for housing, a Western Sydney City Deal that will provide opportunities for planning and zoning reform, as well as a range of financial incentives to assist first-home buyers, downsizing for older Australians and to encourage private-sector investment in affordable housing. The Australian Institute of Architects and the Planning Institute of Australian have cautiously welcomed the measures. Ken Maher, outgoing president of the Australian Institute of Architects characterized the government’s housing affordability plan as having “good intentions,” but said there were a number of “missed opportunities” on “critical” issues such as density, climate change and public transport. “There’s a real absence of mention in the budget of climate change,” Maher said. “In the built environment area, there’s quite a lot that can be done to reduce carbon emissions.” He pointed to the Australian Sustainable Built Environment Council’s (ASBEC) Low Carbon, High Performance report released in May 2016, which outlined “the potential for the Australian built environment sector to make a major contribution to” reaching a zero-net emissions goal by 2050. The report called on policy makers to adopt a nation plan that includes minimum standards for buildings and targeted incentives. Read more here
[post_title] => ‘Good intentions’ or ‘cruel hoax’? Budget 2017’s housing affordability plan draws vexed reactions [post_excerpt] => Architects cautious, some critical. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27196 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-23 12:42:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-23 02:42:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27196 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27177 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-19 11:10:51 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-19 01:10:51 [post_content] => By Charles Pauka The latest statistics from the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) have underlined the Transport Workers’ Union’s claims that truck drivers are overly represented in road statistics and that the statistics are getting worse.   BITRE’s latest report found that during the 12 months to the end of March 2017, 217 people died from 196 fatal crashes involving heavy trucks or buses. These included:
  • 118 deaths from 104 crashes involving articulated trucks, 87 deaths from 77 crashes involving heavy rigid trucks and 25 deaths from 24 crashes involving buses.
  • Fatal crashes involving articulated trucks: increased by 7.2 per cent compared with the corresponding period one year earlier and increased by an average of 0.9 per cent per year over the three years to March 2017.
  • Fatal crashes involving heavy rigid trucks: increased by 4.1 per cent compared with the corresponding period one year earlier and increased by an average of 2.5 per cent per year over the three years to March 2017.
  Read more here.  This story first appeared in Transport & Logistics & News. [post_title] => Truckies over-represented in fatal crash stats, Bureau confirms union claims [post_excerpt] => Statistics worsening for truck driver deaths. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27177 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-19 11:10:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-19 01:10:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27177 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27165 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-18 15:50:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-18 05:50:21 [post_content] =>   By Allen Koehn, Associate VP and GM – Public Sector at Infosys We are entering a new phase of human evolution. However, it is not one comprising new limbs or larger eyes. Rather, it involves the pursuit of ultimate control, despite human error, through technological innovation. The robotic automation of society alluded to in the science fiction of our past is finally becoming a reality - one technological advancement at a time. Human involvement, paper-heavy administration and room for error are exponentially decreasing as technologies like blockchain digitise and automate entire processes and interactions. What started as a platform for the transaction of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies now has the potential to span industries and verticals across the globe. There has been much hype about blockchain, with banks reporting annual savings of US$8-12 billion after its implementation1, but seemingly little understanding about what exactly it is and how it can be put to valuable use in different sectors. What is blockchain? Transactions - financial or otherwise - occur across networks every second. With blockchain, each time a transaction occurs, a network of computers carry out a series of algorithms, identifying the originating device and its user, and validating the transaction. This transaction is then added to a digital ledger (public or private) and attached to an irreversible chain of transactional “blocks”. Verified transactions are permanently recorded, traceable and updated across the entire network every 10 minutes. Blockchain is decentralised – it does not have a central server or administrator, but rather exists on and is managed by the network itself. Unimaginable computational processing power is needed to override the network. There are no singular points of vulnerability and the corruption of any one bit of data results in its network-wide corruption. Ultimate visibility and control makes unauthorised actions impossible. Consequently, blockchain is almost entirely secure in the face of human-led threats.  It’s not just about security Blockchain’s automation makes paper trails redundant, exponentially decreasing lost documents or delayed payments. Imagine a future where financial transactions within governments are automatically and irreversibly recorded, or citizens can transact confidentially without physical presence at a government office. Costs are reduced, efficiency is improved and the way for ultimate transparency is paved. Governments and organizations alike can achieve a true competitive advantage with blockchain (and its accompanying applications and digital technologies). So, for those working in government, scratching your head about how to leverage this new technology, here’s five ways that I see blockchain being used in the public sector:
  1.  Identification
Gone are the days of a 100 point ID checks. With digitised birth certificates and ID documents, blockchain enables a single personal identifier. It is an entirely new and reliable way of identifying members of an ecosystem – from citizens to government agencies – enabling everything from digital voting (which is in the works for Australia’s 2017 elections) to confidential legal disputes.
  1. Registries
Blockchain enables the digitization of property titles, car registrations, medical records and more. Once recorded, documents become digital proof, available – for example – for trusted use in legal battles. Printing and tracking costs decrease and smart contracts can automate actions when conditions are met. For example, a digital driver’s license can notify its owner of expiration, or simply auto-renew by triggering a debit off the owner’s account.
  1. Payments
There is room for (and talk of) the use of blockchain and cryptocurrencies in place of existing financial institutions. But blockchain technologies also have immense potential to eliminate fraud and tax avoidance, thanks to built-in transparency and trust protocols. Social benefits, grants, compensation, tax returns and inter-government payments can be automated, recorded and possibly even accessed by the public.
  1. Accountability
On that note, blockchain makes ultimate accountability in all spheres possible. Financial movements can be permanently recorded and traced, or voting results can be updated on a public network, keeping voters in the loop. Each time a change is made to a law recorded on the ledger, the public has full visibility. Public services can be delivered with ease to a trusting population, thanks to this layer of transparency.
  1. Automation
The processes of filing applications, making and receiving payments or benefits, getting visas and transferring permissions or titles can all be streamlined beyond what was previously possible – making blockchain particularly beneficial to developing markets whose existing infrastructure cannot otherwise accommodate such radical change. As with most innovations, the possible use cases of technological advancements like Blockchain are often only discovered much later in their lifecycle. Preconceived notions should not hinder the exploration of evolutionary innovations in new and unique contexts. The true power of technology is only truly realised when it evolves outside its original borders. Only when we colour outside our existing lines can we truly evolve. We believe that Blockchain has the potential to truly evolve the way our governments, organisations and society functions. [post_title] => Five ways blockchain will transform the public sector [post_excerpt] => Making paper trails redundant. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27165 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-19 10:50:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-19 00:50:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27165 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 14 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27369 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-06-16 12:00:08 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-06-16 02:00:08 [post_content] =>   By Charles Pauka CASE builds the machines for the long haul. And as councils typically keep their plant and equipment for 8+ years, they can rest assured knowing that their CASE machine will not only perform for its first life with Council, but continue to perform through its 2nd and 3rd lives once replaced and sold to a new owner. For performance, reliability and resale value, councils around Australia continue to place their trust in CASE equipment – again and again. Founded in 1842, CASE Construction Equipment has over the last 175 years built a reputation as a leading and respected global manufacturer of construction equipment. Today, CASE offers a full line of equipment with over 90 different models around the world, including heavy excavators, wheel loaders, crawler dozers, skid-steer loaders, mini excavators, and backhoe loaders. CASE equipment and technologies deliver productivity, efficiency, fuel economy and cost-effectiveness to the benefit of its customers’ bottom line. CASE innovates to design equipment that is intuitive and straightforward to use so that operators maximise their productivity. GovernmentNews.com.au would like to congratulate CASE Construction Equipment on its 175 years of building productivity, and to celebrate, you can view a comprehensive and informative guide to CASE’s history, products and capabilities by clicking on this link. Government agencies and contractors need access to a full line of equipment, including heavy excavators, wheel loaders, crawler dozers, skid-steer loaders, mini excavators, and backhoe loaders, for maximum productivity and fast results. Read on to find out where to get your hands on the best equipment and back-up in Australia today. Full report here.    [post_title] => Governments trust CASE [post_excerpt] => Machines built for the long haul. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27369 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-06-20 10:47:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-06-20 00:47:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27369 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 173 [max_num_pages] => 13 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => 1 [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 4e56da8b7dcff5e884af27e0b7ae1306 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )